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What ever happened to: Bubble-Tape?


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Renee Rosenow

Bubble-Tape.

No, I’m not referring to some silly soapy adhesive, but rather the six-foot long piece of gum capable of keeping you chewing for hours, if not days. It was a rather large phenomenon during my childhood and was shared throughout kick ball games, Little League baseball and never in class (because that was against the rules, of course).

Was it the catch phrase, “it’s six feet of bubble gum for you, not them,” that made it seem so cool because it wasn’t for your parents? Or maybe the possibility of blowing the biggest bubble in history that kept us captivated? Who knows what ultimately made Bubble Tape as big of a trend as it was, but one thing remains constant, and that is the fact that Bubble Tape is not your ordinary piece of bubble gum.

Bubble Tape first burst onto the scene in the early ’90s and instantly became one of the most popular bubble gums of its time. Wrigley, the company that makes Bubble Tape, directed the new product at pre-teens and hoped their unique package style would be much more exciting for children.

The standard Bubble Tape package is a small, round plastic container that is similar in size and shape to a hockey puck. Inside the plastic package is a six foot spiral of gum that is about the width of a thumbnail. The package had teeth at the end to tear your desired piece size and opened with a clam-like motion.

Sophomore Marta Schmuki said most people’s favorite part was that, “you can have it as long as you want, or as short as you want.”

This very trait of Bubble Tape made it possible to chew a very small wad, or a massive behemoth of gum, all from the same package.

Not only did the package make it possible to chew any size piece you desired, but it also tricked children into thinking the product was something more than just glorified bubble gum.

Schmuki said she preferred Bubble Tape over regular gum.

“Yes, I think it tastes better because it’s in tape form.”

After checking several stores around the campus, I was unable to find any Bubble Tape available for purchase. However, Bubble Tape is still being made by Wrigley under the name “Hubba Bubba Bubble Tape”, and is being sold online and in stores. The product is now available in 12 different flavors ranging from the classic “Awesome Original,” to the seasonal “Candy Cane.” If the regular six foot size wasn’t enough for you, Wrigley now has the answer with a “King Size” (nine feet) package and the “Mega Roll” (10 feet).

So, what ever happened to Bubble Tape? They changed their name, added some flavors and now offer up to four more feet of gum per package.

Pellegrino is a sophomore print journalism major and copy editor for The Spectator.

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The official student newspaper of University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire since 1923.
What ever happened to: Bubble-Tape?