Sculpting the city of Eau Claire

Eau Claire hosts the ninth season of their sculpture tour where sculptors present their work free for the public

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Sculpting the city of Eau Claire

A strong metal dragon gazes over the public.

A strong metal dragon gazes over the public.

Photo by Gabbie Henn

A strong metal dragon gazes over the public.

Photo by Gabbie Henn

Photo by Gabbie Henn

A strong metal dragon gazes over the public.

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Artists gathered and talked about their work and their creations over the past years last Thursday at this year’s downtown sculpture tour.

This year, more than 30 artists were featured in this tour for the public to meet. Every year, new sculptors are placed around the Eau Claire area for the public to experience art in their everyday lives.

During the event, the public could purchase raffle tickets in hopes of winning the local sculpture titled “Claire, the Kangaroo,” sculpted by local artists Aiden Demarais and Tim James, who created the piece out of old spoons.

The majority of the sculptures are made with recycled materials and a few artists, such as artist Dale Lewis, promotes this as well. Lewis included his work in his logo “Imagine, Create, Recycle.”

After the event was over, the artists gathered in a private reception to celebrate their work. Many pieces are still awaiting plaques with the artist and the title.

Henn can be reached at [email protected].

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  • Kimber Fiebiger’s bronze sculpture, “Jam n Eggs,” was on display for over a year and recently were taken down.

    Photo by Gabbie Henn

  • “Claire, the Kangaroo,” by Aiden Demarais and Tim James, was on auction for any lucky person who purchased a raffle ticket.

    Photo by Gabbie Henn

  • “Claire, the Kangaroo” is made almost entirely out of recycled utensils, such as forks and spoons.

    Photo by Gabbie Henn

  • Dale Lewis (pictured here), has been creating his sculptures for over nine years and has been included in the sculpture tour for a few years now.

    Photo by Gabbie Henn

  • Travis Sorenson is a full-time artist and salvages yards for his materials in order to recycle.

    Photo by Gabbie Henn

  • Lee Leunig and Sherri Treeby have been partners in their artwork for over 30 years. They have done more than 240 sculptures together.

    Photo by Gabbie Henn

  • Tim James (left) and Aiden Demarais (right) have worked on a few sculptures together. Their piece originally titled “Yosemite” and then retitled “Eclipse” the year after, was given best in show.

    Photo by Gabbie Henn

  • Tim James and Aiden Demarais’ sculpture, “Eclipse,” shines brightly in the sunlight where the public could view and possibly bid on it.

    Photo by Gabbie Henn

  • The aluminum bear, “Salmon Runner,” with designs of fish in the structure, has been viewed by the public for over a year by artist Heather Wall.

    Photo by Gabbie Henn

  • Louis Peterson’s “High 5” was the people's choice in 2011 and has become a staple piece in Phoenix Park.

    Photo by Gabbie Henn

  • Artists Lee Leunig and Sherri Treeby sculpture, “Granny’s Garden,” represents the local farmers market vendors, and it stands in the Phoenix Park vendor location.

    Photo by Gabbie Henn

  • A new sculpture, with the label “Fishkabobs,” stands outside on the corner of Madison Street waiting for new viewers.

    Photo by Gabbie Henn

  • An untitled piece stands tall with bronze and metal work.

    Photo by Gabbie Henn

  • “Arc of Peace” by Lorri Acott stands at the corner of Wisconsin Street and Barstow Street.

    Photo by Gabbie Henn

  • Untitled and by an unnamed artist, a moose with a tiny bird sits outside of The Livery Restaurant and Saloon.

    Photo by Gabbie Henn

  • Outside of “That’s Adorable!” sits a metal turtle attracting children with its animated appearance.

    Photo by Gabbie Henn

  • “Celeste,” by Crysten Nysseth, was people’s choice in 2017.

    Photo by Gabbie Henn

  • A metal bronze structure tree stands outside on Barstow Street.

    Photo by Gabbie Henn

  • Many artists incorporate recycled materials to influence more environmental artwork.

    Photo by Gabbie Henn

  • Lee Leuning noted that he and Sherris Treeby, “cast their own bronze,” meaning that to know the process, one has to learn it themselves.

    Photo by Gabbie Henn

  • A curved-like metal wave replaces Dale Lewis’ “When Pigs Fly the Wright Way.”

    Photo by Gabbie Henn

  • Travis Sorenson noted he used recycled security gates in one of his recent pieces.

    Photo by Gabbie Henn

  • “Rock Bass” by Dale Lewis represents an actual Rock Bass fish, “On the stretch of a small river that I grew up on, it was the only fish I could catch that was big enough to eat,” he said. “For me, it was the prize.”

    Photo by Gabbie Henn

  • A new sculpture replaces Tim James and Aiden Demarais’ fairly popular piece, entitled “Yosemite.”

    Photo by Gabbie Henn

  • A curved sculptor takes the place of last year’s “Hard Hat Joe, Jr.” by Lee Leuning and Sherri Treeby.

    Photo by Gabbie Henn

  • The overall cost of the sculptures combined comes to over $500,000.

    Photo by Gabbie Henn

  • “Jam n Eggs” is replaced by a new sculpture on the outside of Revival Records.

    Photo by Gabbie Henn

  • On the outside of “Wintership Tattoo” stands a tall sculpture in wood and plexiglass mediums.

    Photo by Gabbie Henn

  • A music-inspired sculpture represents the sounds of Eau Claire’s music side.

    Photo by Gabbie Henn

  • The public could interact with the musical composer piece, outside the Children’s Museum.

    Photo by Gabbie Henn

  • “The Mistrow” by Lee Leunig and Sherri Treeby, becomes a new staple to the sculpture tour for 2019.

    Photo by Gabbie Henn

  • A sculpture outside of “Pedals Music” represents the women and men of Northwest Airlines through a child playing with a plane.

    Photo by Gabbie Henn

  • A metal raccoon stands upside down as he directs towards the small mouse, buried under the grass.

    Photo by Gabbie Henn

  • A tall, rusted sunflower gazes over next to the downtown Eau Claire cinema.

    Photo by Gabbie Henn

  • A small retro golf player stands upon across from Antique Emporium.

    Photo by Gabbie Henn

  • A new sculptor replaces “Salmon Runner” outside of Raggedy Man.

    Photo by Gabbie Henn

  • Many sculptures have a in the round works, making it a piece to interact with to the public.

    Photo by Gabbie Henn

  • A small glazed piece stands with an organic manner through its touch of birds on a branch.

    Photo by Gabbie Henn

  • A bronze sculpture represents the action of a paperboy bundled up in the representation of Midwest cold seasons.

    Photo by Gabbie Henn

  • A strong metal dragon gazes over the public.

    Photo by Gabbie Henn

  • “Germination II” by Nathan Johansen was the previous sculpture here.

    Photo by Gabbie Henn

  • The public may get intimidated when the dragon glares down from high above.

    Photo by Gabbie Henn

  • A dream catcher stands outside of The Acoustic Cafe.

  • Glasswork, feathers and bronze are incorporated into this piece.

    Photo by Gabbie Henn

  • Lee Leunig and Sherri Treeby’s popular piece “Hey Mary Lou!” has become a staple of the town as it stands outside the YMCA.

    Photo by Gabbie Henn

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