Art students present their “Responsibly Crazy” artwork

This year's Senior Exhibition at The Foster Gallery will feature six art students' work

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Art students present their “Responsibly Crazy” artwork

Heidi Johnson, a drawing and painting student, poses in her infinity room.

Heidi Johnson, a drawing and painting student, poses in her infinity room.

Photo by Gabbie Henn

Heidi Johnson, a drawing and painting student, poses in her infinity room.

Photo by Gabbie Henn

Photo by Gabbie Henn

Heidi Johnson, a drawing and painting student, poses in her infinity room.

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On May 3, the Foster Gallery opened their annual Bachelor of Fine Arts Senior Exhibition. The exhibition will run until May 19.

The six featured seniors — Siri Stensberg, Andrea Fischer, Heidi Johnson, Jeremy Borchert, Matthew Bergs and Richard Roth — combined their work to create their exhibition titled, “Responsibly Crazy.”

The opening reception for this exhibition was held from 6:30-7:30 p.m. on May 4. The students presented their work in graphic design, drawing and painting, photography and illustration.

The different work presented ranged from furniture made of yarn, a storybook of a walrus, an app created for powerlifting and various other art pieces.

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  • Matthew Bergs, a fourth-year illustration student, stands next to the artwork he presented.

    Photo by Gabbie Henn

  • The 2019 Spring Senior BFA Exhibition was presented by six seniors. It was titled “Responsibly Crazy.”

    Photo by Gabbie Henn

  • Matthew Bergs created bookmarks along with his book, titled “Otto’s Fishing Day Off.”

    Photo by Gabbie Henn

  • Bergs framed a few of his illustrations, which were created for his children's book.

    Photo by Gabbie Henn

  • One of Bergs’ many illustrations, titled “Color Sample: Fishing.”

    Photo by Gabbie Henn

  • Viewers could sit in the living space to enjoy the book.

    Photo by Gabbie Henn

  • A viewer reads “Otto’s Fishing Day Off” at the gallery reception.

    Photo by Gabbie Henn

  • “Otto’s Fishing Day Off” was propped up on the fireplace for readers to grab and read.

    Photo by Gabbie Henn

  • Siri Stensberg, a fourth-year drawing and painting student, stands next to a few of her presentations.

    Photo by Gabbie Henn

  • Stensberg used oil as her medium and painted on canvas.

    Photo by Gabbie Henn

  • One of Stenberg's many oil pieces, titled “Wilting Tucan.”

    Photo by Gabbie Henn

  • Stensberg utilized abstract work in her paintings, such as this piece, titled, “Sanguine Squid.”

    Photo by Gabbie Henn

  • Stenberg incorporated LED lights in her oil paintings.

    Photo by Gabbie Henn

  • The LED lights shined through her painting titled “Resurfaced.”

    Photo by Gabbie Henn

  • Stensberg exhibited eight oil paintings for her senior exhibition.

    Photo by Gabbie Henn

  • Stensberg smiles with some viewers and stands for a photo on opening night.

    Photo by Gabbie Henn

  • Richard Roth, a fourth-year graphic design student, stands next to his creation, a UX/UI app.

    Photo by Gabbie Henn

  • Roth designed a weightlifting app to log and track as one continues their progress.

    Photo by Gabbie Henn

  • Roth presented a variety of pictures describing the process of the app and what it is meant to give.

    Photo by Gabbie Henn

  • The app tracks data the best fit for each individual and gives one the specific needs to improve.

    Photo by Gabbie Henn

  • “Workout apps, in particular, are a pain to find, so I decided to make an app that is designed for the user and fulfills the goal of the app,” Roth said in his artist statement.

    Photo by Gabbie Henn

  • Andrea Fischer, a fourth-year photography student, stands under her little yarn world of presented work, titled, “fur-niture.”

    Photo by Gabbie Henn

  • Fischer takes videos of her hanging yarn fixtures for her viewers on the other side of the screen.

    Photo by Gabbie Henn

  • Here, yarn is stretched from the ceiling to the ground, which Fischer spent several hours putting together.

    Photo by Gabbie Henn

  • Various pieces were created out of yarn, varying from stools to mirrors, and even a jewelry box.

    Photo by Gabbie Henn

  • Andrea Fischer presented her work featuring yarn and fur.

    Photo by Gabbie Henn

  • The chair was “yarning” for attention as the little world could be touched and sat upon by whoever came across it.

    Photo by Gabbie Henn

  • Yarn is captured in all aspects of Fischer’s work in a globe of color and comfort.

    Photo by Gabbie Henn

  • I saw it through the grape yarn? A jewelry box covered in yarn sits upon a bedside yarn table.

    Photo by Gabbie Henn

  • A “yarndelier” hangs above the center of all the other furniture.

    Photo by Gabbie Henn

  • A grand entrance is created, for viewers to enter and escape into a new little world.

    Photo by Gabbie Henn

  • Fischer created hanging plants in the design of yarn for viewers to gaze at.

    Photo by Gabbie Henn

  • The yarn encompassed the whole room through the reflections.

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  • The Art and Design program contrasts on the outside of the gallery through the yarn.

    Photo by Gabbie Henn

  • Fischer has viewers envision a piece of her life and how she expresses her attitude through her own work, by creating art that utilizes everyday items.

    Photo by Gabbie Henn

  • Viewers can come and get tangled up in Fischer’s work until May 19.

    Photo by Gabbie Henn

  • The countless strings of yarn reflect on Fischer’s name, counting the number of hours she spent to create her pieces.

    Photo by Gabbie Henn

  • Fischer gets all dolled up, as professor Wanrudee Buranakorn paints her nails with silver sparkles.

    Photo by Gabbie Henn

  • One can get all yarned up in each artist’s work in this year’s senior exhibition.

    Photo by Gabbie Henn

  • Heidi Johnson, a drawing and painting student, poses in her infinity room.

    Photo by Gabbie Henn

  • Johnson presented a variety of pieces from ink drawing to sculptors. This piece presented here is titled “Transcendent.” It was made with a medium of oil on canvas.

    Photo by Gabbie Henn

  • Johnson presented a sculpture, titled, “Paradox of the Mind.”

    Photo by Gabbie Henn

  • Johnson’s sculptor piece, “Paradox of the Mind,” comes from the inside and out. As viewers gaze into the piece, a sense of what's on the inside of the mind is evoked.

    Photo by Gabbie Henn

  • Johnson and Fischer presented an infinity mirror room, titled “Eternity.”

    Photo by Gabbie Henn

  • The room had mirrors on all sides forming the glow of the infinity with the hanging yarn structures created by Fischer.

    Photo by Gabbie Henn

  • An hourglass stretched on the mirrors, encompassing the meaning of “Eternity.”

    Photo by Gabbie Henn

  • Viewers can gaze upon this installment in the dark to get a feeling of time and space.

    Photo by Gabbie Henn

  • An ink drawing on paper, untitled, captured many viewers’ eyes in its stand-out size.

    Photo by Gabbie Henn

  • Johnson painted with oil on canvas for this piece, titled, “I don’t even like Pink.”

    Photo by Gabbie Henn

  • Jeremy Borchert, an illustration student, stands next to his posters inspired by the video game “Halo.”

    Photo by Gabbie Henn

  • Borchert presented a time lapse of a piece he illustrated based on the video game “Halo.”

    Photo by Gabbie Henn

  • Borchert’s love for comic art is illustrated in his illustrations.

    Photo by Gabbie Henn

  • Borchert presented ink and digital prints, such as this one, titled “Halo: The Great Journey Combat Evolved.”

    Photo by Gabbie Henn

  • Characters were created that were inspired by Borchert’s interest in video games and comics.

    Photo by Gabbie Henn

  • This piece, titled, “Outdoorsman,” is one of Borchert’s many creations in his character concepts.

    Photo by Gabbie Henn

  • A viewer admires Jeremy Borchert’s world of comic art and character creations.

    Photo by Gabbie Henn

  • Just a bunch of people being "responsibly crazy" in front of the art director as the reception comes to a close. (Left to right) Andrea Fischer, Matthew Bergs, Sire Stensberg, Heidi Johnson, Jeremy Borchert and gallery director Amanda Bulger.

    Photo by Gabbie Henn

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Henn can be reached at [email protected]

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